Fashion & Beauty Lifestyle October 4, 2017

Perfection vs Perception

Today, some find it hard to differentiate between reality and what we see in the media.  There are a lot of smoke and mirrors, with a sleight of hand anything is possible.


 

Unfortunately, some compare themselves to that illusion. But what we see in the world of fashion and celebrity is just that: an illusion. It is something most will never measure up to and it can lead to feelings of inadequacy and frustration. It can lead to self-torment.

 

It is unfortunate that many feel this way, more so for those young adolescents who idolise celebrity and strive to recreate themselves based on what they perceive. The lifestyle is often accurate, it can be intriguing, but we are never party to the bigger picture. We will always fall short when comparing celebrity lives to our own, we live in different worlds, we work different jobs, our lives, too, will never be constantly scrutinised or publicly judged.  It comes at a price.  Why would we wish to sacrifice our privacy? It’s the same with looks. I have seen photoshoots first-hand and I have also seen the repercussions that pressure can inflict on those within the fashion industry. It is not all glamour. It is very sad. We compare our looks based on magic. Professional celebrity shoots are airbrushed, tweaked and touched-up, yet we attempt to define ourselves against them. We are talking about men and women who may have been under the knife and then perfectly lit and edited to the core. No-one should ever look at themselves and believe they are not enough.

 

There is beauty in everyone. I see scars as a representation of a life lived, fine lines as an expression of thought and feelings, grey hairs as internal glitter that protrudes through the surface to announce, “I survived!” The many truly unique characteristics that make us human and stand out are must be celebrated. We strive to be our best, and we should, but we should never do it for anyone other than ourselves. We should embrace what we have and work with, not against it. We did not come off a production line, we have flaws and that makes us special. It makes us memorable, and it defines ‘perfect beauty’. 

 

The problem today as most of us find it hard to differentiate between reality and that which we see in the media. It’s a lot of smoke and mirrors. If you ask yourself if you believe in magic, the answer would be a realistic “no”, but does it entice us into a world of imagination, wonderment and appreciation of skill and craft? “Yes” it most certainly does. With a slight of hand and an illusion to the eye, anything is possible.

 

Unfortunately, we compare ourselves to that illusion. What we see in the world of fashion and celebrity is just that; what we see with ourselves, falls short at times and with the impressionable or just plain frustrated, we make a comparable to those things which we have no control over and torture ourselves to extent.

 

It is unfortunate that many feel this way, and I know more-so for those young adolescents who idolise celebrity in a way of lifestyle and looks, and strive to recreate themselves based on what they perceive. The lifestyle is accurate in most, we do not see the full picture nor understand it, but it can be intriguing. Comparing to our own, it can fall short but we live in different worlds, we work different jobs, our lives too may not be constantly scrutinized, judged, invaded wrongly nor discussed publicly in a fashion which represents them falsely. We have our privacy, with lack of intrusion, so why then do so many wish for this? It comes at a price. The same for looks. I have seen first-hand what makes a photoshoot, and I have also seen the repercussions of what pressures can inflict on those within the fashion industry. It is not all glamour. It is very sad. We compare our looks, based on magic. Professional celebrity shoots are airbrushed, tweaked and touched up; but yet we define our own credibility of who we are based on this. We are talking about many men and women whom may have been under the knife and then placed in perfect lighting and then edited to the core …. It is unfair for anyone to look at themselves and fear they are not enough.

 

There is beauty in everyone. For me, I see the scar’s as a representation of a life that has been lived and stories that can be told, fine lines as a person who has spent time engaging in expressive thought and feelings, for the grey hairs that pop through as ones “internal glitter reaching the surface” to say they survived their youth and ‘here I am!’, for the wobbly bits that carried or nursed a child and for the many truly unique characteristics that make us all human, and that make us stand out. This is what needs to be celebrated. We strive to be our best, and we should, but we should never do it for anyone other than ourselves, embracing all we have and working with it, not against it. We did not come off a production line, we have flaws and that makes us special. It makes us memorable, and it completely defines ‘perfect beauty’.

 

Words: Donna Malneek

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